A Game Night

Tonight we had a game night. We haven’t had one in quite a while, and it was relatively short notice, so our guest lineup was shaken up a bit (also, family visiting from England will throw that for a bit of a loop, too).

Shortly before people came, I was trying to brush up on the rules for Captains Of Industry, which I’ve been looking forward to playing for a long time (indeed, it’s been sitting in a prominent spot for a while), but in the end it didn’t seem like the right time to introduce a game that complicated. Maybe another time.

I brought up Catan, Dominion and Ticket To Ride from the basement, and we ended up not playing any of those, either.

I talked to one of the guests about the last game I Kickstarted, whose arrival I’m looking forward to: Bomb Squad. Co-operative but seeming to avoid the problem with games like Pandemic, of one player dominating (“here, you do this, you do this, then I can do this…”).

I know two games, brought by one set of guests, were played on a table I was not at. One was a trivia one, and some answers floated from our table to theirs.

The first game I played was Firefly Clue. I’d played it once before and enjoyed it. The last time, I’d just figured out whodunnit, and that was enough to tip the game’s owner to the same information and she won.

This time, I’d pretty much concluded the What, was pretty sure on the Who, and I’d lucked into the Where on my last guess, but that was enough to tip my mother off onto the right answers, so she got to the centre square and won.

Seems like you need a bit more space on the answer sheets, to write down who asked about what, who answered about what, and who has what, to keep better track.

The next game I played was Love Letter, which I was introduced to not long ago. We played nearly two games: the first game, I was in the lead with three cubes and only needed one to go, then one player had to go and another joined, so we started scoring from scratch. The second game, then, the new player, my sister-in-law, convincingly won.

We talked about playing Templar intrigue next, but there weren’t seven people free to play it with (7-10 players). There were still enough adults in the room to play it, but kid-wrangling was still going on, so we have to save this for another time.

The last game we played with guests, The Game Of Things. One player reads the text on a card (“Things you should not teach your pet to do”, “Things that don’t last very long”, “Things you shouldn’t do on a first date”, and so on), and all the players write something that fits with what the card said. The person who read the card reads the answers, and the next player has to guess who wrote what. If they get one wrong, the next player guesses, and so on, until everyone knows who wrote what (the player reading doesn’t guess, so the handwriting doesn’t give it away).

That was a pretty funny game, particularly as it was getting late, and people were verging into getting punchy and silly. Seems a good one to have on hand to be able to pull out.

We then chatted a bit about games we liked the sound of but haven’t tried. Currently on my radar of games I’d like to try and possibly even get, are Firefly The Game, and T.I.M.E. Stories. And I liked the story behind the creation of Euphoria: Build A Better Dystopia.

It sounds like we might get Love Letter in the household at some point, too.

The last game I tried, after all our guests had gone, was one my sister (and brother-in-law, and niece) had left for my kids. My wife had played it with Oldest (I think my mother-in-law played some with them, too). It was called Loopin’ Louie. A crazed pilots flies round and round, trying to knock your chickens down. You can make him pull up when he gets close to you. Sounds like the kids enjoyed it, I played it against my wife, and it seems you might be able to learn how hard to hit i and exactly when, to make the plane come down again in exactly the right place. On the other hand, it keeps a fairly even playing field between the kids and grown-ups.

A good, fun, night.

Remember: games are good for you, but don’t eat too many at once.

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