Adventures in Computer Security

My first email address was a Hotmail one. I was in college, and kept trying lots and lots of different things until I found one that they didn’t try and stick a number after. It was frog-themed, and I’ve kept that theme ever since. Even when I branched out into other webmail, even with a slightly modified name on message boards. I had a different website for a while, that had an amphibious motif to it.

I ran Outlook for a while, but have kept coming back to webmail.

These days, of course, we know that email is collected and analysed, some by the email providers to advertise to you better, some by the government because they’re fricking control freaks.

When America was still The Colonies, the British would intercept and analyse mail, looking for treasonous, rebellious and terroristic intent. The colonies set up their own mail system to get around this. Now the US government collects the world’s emails for the exact same purpose. What they’re saying (and not just with this issue), is that the British were right all along.

Well done, you public officials who swore to uphold the Constitution (which was rather against this sort of thing), but let this happen.

Just like the American colonists of yesteryear, there are digital colonists who rightly think that perhaps today’s government is overreaching just a little bit. And then finding ways around it.

Encrypting emails is one way that people are reclaiming their liberty and freedom.

A while ago I read an article on things you could do to improve your internet security and privacy, and a new one just did the rounds in the last couple of weeks. I gave the SeaMonkey internet suite a go, partly for a “try a different browser” challenge (I now use SeaMonkey, IE9, Vivaldi and Opera 12 daily, with FireFox as a “guest” browser on the machine proper, and FireFox as the default browser on my Lubuntu Virtual Machines). I chose SeaMonkey also for email encryption, but I haven’t tried setting that up until today. I read about it months ago, and I’m mainly getting around to it now because I’m finally setting up (after about a week now) the email for this site.

SeaMonkey’s email program doesn’t do the privacy stuff on its own, you have to install a couple of other things.

I followed the instructions for Enigmail. The first thing to do is install GnuPG (which was very straightforward). Installing Enigmail for SeaMonkey was a bit less obvious, but I found it by going through SeaMonkey’s menu, and looking for addons. Setting everything up was straightforward. Well, might be not-entirely-easy for the not-techie, especially throwing in the POP3 settings and everything (POP downloads your emails from the web server to your computer, IMAP leaves them on the server – figured the less time on the server the better). Fairly straightforward to do, but a bit of work.

If you’re looking through the instructions, I didn’t put my Public Key up for the world to see, yet, or really any of the steps after that.

Start small. One step at a time. and work up to sending everything encrypted: cat pictures, puns, world domination plans, the usual :)

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